Domestic Waste Disposal Practice on Residential Property Investment

224

PURCHASE-N8500

Domestic Waste Disposal Practice on Residential Property Investment

Background to the Study

Household solid waste is one of the most difficult sources of solid waste to manage because of its diverse range of composite materials (Huntley, 2010). A substantial portion is made up of garbage, a term for the waste matter that arises from the preparation, and consumption of food and consists of waste food, vegetable peelings and other organic matter (Slack, Gronow & Voulvoulis, 2005). Other components of household solid waste include plastics, paper, glass, textiles, cellophane, metals and some hazardous waste from household products such as paint, garden pesticides, pharmaceuticals, fluorescent tubes, personal care products, batteries containing heavy metals and discarded wood treated with dangerous substances such as anti-fungal and anti-termite chemicals.

 

Domestic waste also known as “municipal solid waste” is waste that is generated as a result of the ordinary day-to-day use of a domestic premise. It is either taken from the premises by or on behalf of the person who generated the waste; or collected by or on behalf of a local government as part of a waste collection and disposal system. The wastes could be both solid and liquid types; and the way they are going to be handled, stored, and disposed can expose the environment and public health to risks (Zhu, Asnani, Zurbrügg, Anapolsky, & Mani, 2008). Globally, millions of tons of municipal solid waste are generated every day. Urban waste management is drawing increasing attention, as it can easily be observed that too much garbage is lying uncollected in the streets, causing inconvenience, environmental pollution, and posing a public health risk (Zia, & Devadas, 2008).

Rouse (2008) defined Solid waste as “material which no longer has any value to its original owner, and which is discarded”. The main constituents of solid waste in urban areas are organic waste (including kitchen waste and garden trimmings), paper, glass, metals and plastics. Ash, dust and street sweepings can also form a significant portion of the waste. Rouse (2008), opined that; Solid waste management (SWM) involves the collection, storage, transportation, processing, treatment, recycling and final disposal of waste. Systems need to be simple, affordable, and sustainable (financially, environmentally and socially) and should be equitable, providing collection services to poor as well as wealthy households

PURCHASE-N8500

______________________________________