Self esteem and social acceptance as predicting factors of social adjustment of students with hearing impairment

54

Self esteem and social acceptance as predicting factors of social adjustment of students with hearing impairment

Abstract

Students with hearing loss are at risk for lower self-esteem due to differences from hearing peers relative to communication skills, physical appearance, and social maturity. This study examines Self esteem and social acceptance as predicting factors of social adjustment of students with hearing impairment. Fifty students with hearing loss wearing cochlear implants or hearing aids participated (Mean age: 12.88 years; mean duration of device use: 3.43 years). Participants independently completed online questionnaires to assess communication skills, social engagement, self-esteem, and temperament. Children with hearing loss rated global self-esteem significantly more positively than hearing peers, t = 2.38, p = .02. Self-esteem ratings attained significant positive correlations with affiliation (r = .42, p = .002) and attention (r = .45, p = .001) temperaments and a significant negative association with depressive mood (r = − .60, p < .0001). No significant correlations emerged between self-esteem and demographic factors, communication skills, or social engagement. Because successful communication abilities do not always co-occur with excellent quality of life, clinicians and professionals working with children with hearing loss need to understand components contributing to self-esteem to improve identification, counseling, and external referrals for children in this population.

Explore; Self-Esteem in Hearing-Impaired Children: The Influence of Communication, Education, and Audiological Characteristics

Purchase=20k