THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK ON THE PERFORMANCE AND CHALLENGES OF FEMALE LECTURERS

73

 

 

Role Theory

This theory suggests that societal expectations of gender roles influence behavior, attitudes, and opportunities for individuals. In the case of female lecturers, gender role theory would suggest that societal expectations of women’s roles as caregivers and nurturers may lead to challenges for female lecturers to balance their professional and personal responsibilities. The theory would also suggest that gender stereotypes may lead to biased perceptions of female lecturers’ abilities and effectiveness.

Social Identity Theory

This theory proposes that individuals derive a sense of identity and self-worth from their membership in social groups. In the context of female lecturers, social identity theory would suggest that gender is a salient identity that influences how female lecturers perceive themselves and how they are perceived by others. The theory would predict that female lecturers may face challenges in establishing their professional identity in a male-dominated academic environment.

Stereotype Threat Theory

This theory suggests that the awareness of negative stereotypes about one’s group can lead to performance anxiety and underperformance. In the case of female lecturers, stereotype threat theory would predict that awareness of negative stereotypes about women’s intellectual abilities and leadership skills may undermine their confidence and performance.

Organizational Culture Theory

This theory suggests that organizational culture shapes behavior, attitudes, and values within an organization. In the context of female lecturers, organizational culture theory would predict that the prevailing culture of academia, which may be male-dominated and hierarchical, may create barriers for female lecturers to succeed and thrive. The theory would also predict that changing the culture of universities to be more inclusive and supportive of diversity could improve the performance and experiences of female lecturers.

Intersectionality Theory

This theory proposes that social identities intersect to create unique experiences of oppression and privilege. In the context of female lecturers, intersectionality theory would suggest that the experiences of female lecturers are shaped not only by their gender but also by other aspects of their identity, such as race, ethnicity, sexuality, and socioeconomic status. The theory would predict that understanding the intersectional experiences of female lecturers is crucial for addressing the challenges they face in academia.

 

Download Full Material-N4000
PAY WITH PAYPAL